Daily News Roundup, February 22, 2012

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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ABOUT K-12

REPORT SCRUTINIZES STATES' TEACHER-INDUCTION POLICIES
Even as there are more and more novice teachers in the ranks of the profession, states' teacher induction policies are generally piecemeal, contends a new report by the New Teacher Center. The report by the Santa Cruz, Calif-based group, which works to help districts institute induction systems, is billed as the first comprehensive examination of states' teacher-induction policies. States were reviewed against 10 standards, which include such factors as how mentors are selected and trained, induction program delivery, and whether there is dedicated funding for the mentoring. The article is in Education Week’s Teacher Beat blog.

RAVITCH SAYS NEW EVALUATION SYSTEM IS 'MADNESS'
The public schools may be closed all week for February Break, but critics and other writers are busy examining the new teacher evaluation agreement that was reached last week. The education historian and writer, Diane Ravitch, paints a picture of the teacher evaluation system that offers a sobering contrast to the giddiness that greeted the announcement of the agreement with the city, state and teachers’ unions. On The New York Review of Books blog, NYR, in a post titled “No Child Left Untested,” Ms. Ravitch calls it “madness” to rely on a system of teacher accountability based on student test scores. The article is in The New York Times’ Schoolbook blog.
 

IN THE BAY AREA AND ACROSS THE COUNTRY, TEACHERS ARE DISCUSSING POSSIBLE CHANGES TO THEIR PROFESSION
As policymakers zero in on the role of teachers in public schools, the U.S. Department of Education has launched the RESPECT Project, an initiative to change the teaching profession and raise its status in American society. In some 100 schools nationwide, small groups of teachers have weighed such proposals as making teaching colleges more selective, offering apprenticeships for teachers-in-training and creating career paths for teachers. Joanne Weiss, the chief of staff for U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, said the department aims to hold events for 5,000 more teachers in the coming months. She said classroom teachers will be key to the success of the project, which stands for Recognizing Educational Success, Professional Excellence and Collaborative Teaching. The article is in the San Jose Mercury News.

 
ABOUT HIGHER ED

TOUR HIGHLIGHTS OBAMA'S PUSH FOR MORE COLLABORATION BETWEEN COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND BUSINESSES
Two high-profile representatives of the Obama administration will hit the road today on a three-day, five-state bus tour to draw attention to successful partnerships between community colleges and businesses. Amid rising concern over unemployment, the administration prominently called on community colleges and businesses to collaborate more during the White House Summit on Community Colleges back in 2010. Its newest proposal is the Community College to Career Fund, which would provide $8-billion to two-year colleges and states to work with companies to train an estimated two million workers in high-growth industries. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.  

SPEED PUTS COMMUNITY COLLEGES FRONT AND CENTER
Community colleges, long the under-loved stepchildren of American higher education, still don’t get the dollars of their four-year counterparts, but they’re standing very much in the spotlight these days. President Barack Obama made them the focus last week when he unveiled his proposed budget, which took place at a Northern Virginia community college he’s now visited four times. The president joked he’d been to campus so often that he’s only three credits shy of graduating. The AP article is in Boston.com.

 

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